Loading...
AQ_AM_20230628_BP_AnnPln_Final 2023-2024 Volume 2-F Washington Region_Final 2023-2024 Annual Monitoring Network Plan for the North Carolina Division of Air Quality Volume 2 Site Descriptions by Metropolitan Statistical Area F. The Washington Monitoring Region June 28, 2023 F2 Table of Contents 2023-2024 Annual Monitoring Network Plan for the North Carolina Division of Air Quality ........................ 1 List of Figures ................................................................................................................................................ 2 List of Tables .................................................................................................................................................. 3 F. The Washington Monitoring Region .......................................................................................................... 4 (1) The Greenville MSA .............................................................................................................................. 4 (2) The Goldsboro MSA ............................................................................................................................. 8 (3) The New Bern MSA ............................................................................................................................ 10 (4) The Non-MSA Portion of the Washington Monitoring Region ........................................................... 12 (5) The North Carolina Portion of the Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News MSA ................................ 19 Appendix F.1 Annual Network Site Review Forms for 2022 ........................................................................ 21 List of Figures Figure F1. Aerial view of the Pitt Co Ag Center site ...................................................................................... 4 Figure F2. The Washington monitoring region ............................................................................................. 4 Figure F3. Locations of monitors in the Greenville MSA .............................................................................. 4 Figure F4. The Pitt Co Ag Center ozone and fine-particle monitoring site ................................................... 4 Figure F5. Pitt Co Ag Center site looking north ............................................................................................. 5 Figure F6. Pitt Co Ag Center site looking west .............................................................................................. 5 Figure F7. Pitt Co Ag Center site looking east ............................................................................................... 5 Figure F8. Pitt Co Ag Center site looking south............................................................................................. 5 Figure F9. Comparison of BAM and FRM results at the Pitt Co Ag Center Site ............................................ 6 Figure F10. Lead and lead compounds emissions to the air in the Greenville MSA from 2009 to 2020 ...... 8 Figure F11. Ozone monitors surrounding the Goldsboro MSA (white circle) and probability of exceeding the 2015 ozone standard .............................................................................................................................. 9 Figure F12. Lead and lead compounds emissions to the air in the Goldsboro MSA from 2009 to 2020 ... 10 Figure F13. Lead and lead compounds emissions to the air in the New Bern MSA from 2009 to 2020 .... 11 Figure F14. Map of ozone exceedance probability for the New Bern (white circle) MSA .......................... 11 Figure F15. Location of the monitoring sites in the Non-MSA Portion of the Washington Monitoring Region ......................................................................................................................................................... 12 Figure F16. Jamesville ozone, particle and sulfur dioxide monitoring site ................................................. 13 Figure F17. Looking north from the Jamesville site .................................................................................... 13 Figure F18. Looking northeast from the Jamesville site ............................................................................. 13 Figure F19. Looking northwest from the Jamesville site ............................................................................ 14 Figure F20. Looking west from the Jamesville site ..................................................................................... 14 Figure F21. Looking southwest from the Jamesville site ............................................................................ 14 F3 Figure F22. Looking east from the Jamesville site ...................................................................................... 14 Figure F23. Looking southeast from the Jamesville site ............................................................................. 14 Figure F24. Looking south from the Jamesville site .................................................................................... 14 Figure F25. Location of the Bayview Ferry site (B) relative to the Aurora site (A) ..................................... 15 Figure F26. Bayview Ferry sulfur dioxide monitoring site .......................................................................... 16 Figure F27.The Bayview Ferry site looking north ........................................................................................ 16 Figure F28. Looking east from the Bayview Ferry site ................................................................................ 16 Figure F29. Looking west from the Bayview Ferry site ............................................................................... 16 Figure F30. The Bayview Ferry site looking south....................................................................................... 16 Figure F31. New and old LCC monitoring site locations ............................................................................. 17 Figure F32. Lenoir Community College ozone monitoring site ................................................................... 17 Figure F33. Looking north from the LCC site............................................................................................... 18 Figure F34. Looking northwest from the LCC site ...................................................................................... 18 Figure F35. Looking northeast from the LCC site ....................................................................................... 18 Figure F36. Looking east from the LCC site ................................................................................................. 18 Figure F37. Looking west from the LCC site ................................................................................................ 18 Figure F38. Looking southwest from the LCC site ...................................................................................... 18 Figure F39. Looking southeast from the LCC site ....................................................................................... 18 Figure F40. Looking south from the LCC site .............................................................................................. 18 Figure F41. Lead and lead compounds emissions to the air from 2009 to 2020 in the portion of the WARO monitoring area that is not in an MSA ............................................................................................ 19 Figure F42. Map of the Virginia Beach MSA showing locations of lead and lead compounds releases from 2009 to 2020 ...................................................................................................................................... 20 List of Tables Table F1. Site Table for Pitt County Agriculture Center ................................................................................ 7 F4 F. The Washington Monitoring Region The Washington monitoring region, shown in Figure F2, has five areas. The Greenville metropolitan statistical area, or MSA, consists of Pitt County. The Goldsboro MSA consists of Wayne County. The New Bern MSA consists of Craven, Jones and Pamlico counties. The non- MSA portion of the Washington monitoring region consists of Beaufort, Bertie, Chowan, Dare, Greene, Hertford, Hyde, Lenoir, Martin, Pasquotank, Perquimans, Tyrrell and Washington counties. The Virginia Beach- Norfolk-Newport News MSA consists of Camden, Currituck and Gates counties. (1) The Greenville MSA The Greenville MSA consists of Pitt County. The principal city is Greenville. The North Carolina Division of Air Quality, or DAQ, operates one monitoring site in this MSA – a collocated ozone and fine-particle monitoring site, which began operating April 1, 2008, at the Pitt County Agricultural Center in Greenville. Figure F3 shows the site location. Figure F1 and Figure F4 through Figure F8 provide views of the site looking north, east, south, and west from the site. Figure F1. Aerial view of the Pitt Co Ag Center site Figure F2. The Washington monitoring region The colored dots show the approximate locations of most of the monitoring sites in this region. Figure F3. Locations of monitors in the Greenville MSA A is the Pitt County Agriculture Center ozone and fine particle monitoring site. The circle represents the neighborhood scale of 4 Km. Figure F4. The Pitt Co Ag Center ozone and fine- particle monitoring site F5 Figure F5. Pitt Co Ag Center site looking north Figure F6. Pitt Co Ag Center site looking west Figure F7. Pitt Co Ag Center site looking east Figure F8. Pitt Co Ag Center site looking south In 2016, DAQ relocated the site on the property due to the construction of a building near the original location. Details on the relocation are available in the 2016-2017 Network Plan, Volume I, Appendix F.1 In 2016, DAQ also added a continuous fine particle monitor to the site. After collecting over two complete years of data, the BAM and FRM appear to agree as demonstrated by the data comparison for April 8, 2016, through June 30, 2019, shown in Figure F9. Thus, the division shut down the FRM monitor at the site on June 30, 2019, and made the BAM monitor the primary monitor on July 1, 2019. On Feb. 8, 2019, DAQ installed a rainwater collection sampler and an air toxics volatile organic compound (VOC) sampler to the site. The rainwater collection sampler began sampling on Feb. 12, 2019, and the VOC sampler began sampling on Feb. 14, 2019. The Washington Regional Office (WARO) collects samples in stainless steel canisters and sends them to the Laboratory Analysis Branch (LAB) where the LAB analyzes them for 68 compounds using the Compendium Method for Toxic Organics 15. Currently, DAQ has been forced to suspend the VOC portion of the UAT program due to staffing issues at the Reedy Creek Analysis Laboratory. This suspension of the VOC program began in February of 2023 and is expected to continue for the remainder of the year. DAQ hopes to reestablish the program in 2024 when staffing and training issues are resolved. DAQ continues to operate the UAT Aldehydes program. Table F1 summarizes site monitoring information. 1 The 2016-2017 Annual Monitoring Network Plan for the North Carolina Division of Air Quality, Volume I, Appendix F. Region 4 Requested Siting Information for the Pitt County Agricultural Center Site Relocation, July 1, 2016, available on the worldwide web at http://xapps.ncdenr.org/aq/documents/DocsSearch.do?dispatch=download&documentId=13150 F6 Figure F9. Comparison of BAM and FRM results at the Pitt Co Ag Center Site F7 Table F1. Site Table for Pitt County Agriculture Center Site Name: Pitt County Agriculture Center AQS Site Identification Number 37-147-0006 Location: 403 Government Circle, Greenville, North Carolina CBSA: Greenville, NC CBSA #: 24780 Latitude 35.641276 Longitude -77.360126 Datum: WGS84 Elevation 7.9 meters Parameter Name Method Method Reference ID Sample Duration Sampling Schedule Ozone Instrumental with Ultraviolet Photometry (047) EQOA-0880-047 1-Hour Mar. 1 to Oct. 31 PM 2.5 local conditions, continuous Met One BAM-1022 Mass Monitor w/ VSCC EQPM-1013-209 1-Hour Every Hour Year Round Volatile organic compounds SS 6L- pressurized canister w/ cryogenic preconcentration: GC/MS, 150 Not applicable 24-hour Every sixth day, year- round Date Monitor Established: Ozone April 1, 2008 Date Monitor Established PM 2.5 local conditions, continuous April 8, 2016 Date Monitor Established Volatile organic compounds Feb. 14, 2019 Nearest Road: New Hope/Detention / Detention Drive Traffic Count: None available – estimated < 3100 Year of Count: 2012 Parameter Name Distance to Road Direction to Road Monitor Type Statement of Purpose Ozone 236 meters West SLAMS Real-time AQI reporting. Compliance w/NAAQS. PM 2.5 local conditions, continuous 236 meters West SLAMS Real-time AQI reporting; Compliance w/NAAQS Volatile organic compounds 236 meters West Special Purpose General background monitor Parameter Name Monitoring Objective Scale Suitable for Comparison to NAAQS Proposal to Move or Change Ozone Population Exposure Neighborhood Yes None PM 2.5 local conditions, continuous Population Exposure Neighborhood Yes None Volatile organic compounds General background Neighborhood Not applicable Monitoring Suspended 2/6/2023 Parameter Name Meets Part 58, Appendix A Requirements Meets Part 58, Appendix C Requirements Meets Part 58, Appendix D Requirements Meets Part 58, Appendix E Requirements Ozone Yes Yes Yes Yes PM 2.5 local conditions, continuous Yes Yes Yes - No requirements Yes Volatile organic compounds Yes Not applicable Yes - No requirements Yes Parameter Name Probe Height (m) Distance to Support Distance to Trees Obstacles Ozone 3.78 1.11 meter >20 meters None PM 2.5 local conditions, continuous 5.13 2.31 meters >20 meters None Volatile organic compounds 5.13 2.31 meters >20 meters None F8 The lead monitoring network requirements as modified in 2016 2 do not result in any lead monitors in the Greenville MSA. As shown in Figure F10, the Greenville MSA does not have any permitted facilities located within its bounds that emit 0.5 ton or more per year of lead.3 Changes to the ozone monitoring requirements in 2015 did not result in more monitoring in the Greenville MSA. The MSA currently has the minimum number of monitors required by 40 CFR Part 58, Appendix D for population exposure monitoring in urban areas. Ozone monitoring began a month earlier on March 1 instead of April 1 starting in 2017. The 2010 nitrogen dioxide monitoring requirements4 did not add nitrogen dioxide monitors in the Greenville MSA because the population is less than 1,000,000. The 2010 sulfur dioxide (SO2) monitoring requirements also did not result in more monitoring in this area because there are no large sources of SO2 in the MSA. The changes to the carbon monoxide monitoring requirements did not result in additional monitoring in this MSA because the population is less than 1,000,000. Figure F10. Lead and lead compounds emissions to the air in the Greenville MSA from 2009 to 2020 (2) The Goldsboro MSA The Goldsboro MSA consists of Wayne County. The major metropolitan area is the City of Goldsboro. DAQ does not operate any monitoring sites in the Goldsboro MSA. The division shut down the fine- particle monitoring site located at Dillard Middle School on Dec. 31, 2015. 2 Revisions to Ambient Monitoring Quality Assurance and Other Requirements, Federal Register, Vol. 81, No. 59, Monday, March 28, 2016, p. 17248, available on the worldwide web at https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016- 03-28/pdf/2016-06226.pdf. 3 United States Environmental Protection Agency. 2020 EPA Toxics Release Inventory Tracker available at https://edap.epa.gov/public/extensions/TRIToxicsTracker/TRIToxicsTracker.html#. 4 Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Nitrogen Dioxide, Federal Register, Vol. 75, No. 26, Feb. 9, 2010, available on the worldwide web at https://www3.epa.gov/ttn/naaqs/standards/nox/fr/20100209.pdf. F9 Currently, DAQ does not monitor for ozone in Goldsboro because there are ozone monitors in the neighboring counties of Johnston and Lenoir. Figure F11 shows the locations of these monitors as well as the Leggett and Pitt County monitors in relation to the Goldsboro MSA. Modeling also indicates that the probability of there being an exceedance of the 2015 ozone standard in the Goldsboro area is less than 40 percent. The surrounding ozone monitors should adequately characterize the ozone concentrations in the Goldsboro area. Figure F11. Ozone monitors surrounding the Goldsboro MSA (white circle) and probability of exceeding the 2015 ozone standard The lead monitoring network requirements, as modified in 2016,5 did not add any lead monitors in the Goldsboro MSA. As shown in Figure F12, the Goldsboro MSA does not have any permitted facilities located within its bounds that emit 0.5 tons or more per year of lead.6 5 Revisions to Ambient Monitoring Quality Assurance and Other Requirements, Federal Register, Vol. 81, No. 59, Monday, March 28, 2016, p. 17248, available on the worldwide web at https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016- 03-28/pdf/2016-06226.pdf. 6 United States Environmental Protection Agency. 2020 EPA Toxics Release Inventory Tracker available at https://edap.epa.gov/public/extensions/TRIToxicsTracker/TRIToxicsTracker.html#. F10 Figure F12. Lead and lead compounds emissions to the air in the Goldsboro MSA from 2009 to 2020 The 2010 nitrogen dioxide monitoring requirements,7 as modified in 2016, also did not increase the number of monitors in the Goldsboro MSA because its population is less than 1,000,000. The 2010 SO2 monitoring requirements did not result in additional SO2 monitors because there are not enough emissions or people in the MSA to require PWEI monitoring. The 2011 changes to the carbon monoxide monitoring requirements also did not result in the addition of any carbon monoxide monitors because the population is less than 1,000,000. (3) The New Bern MSA The New Bern MSA consists of three counties: Craven, Jones and Pamlico. DAQ currently does not operate any monitoring stations in the New Bern MSA. The current monitoring regulations do not require DAQ to operate any monitors in this area. The lead monitoring network requirements, as modified in 2016,8 do not require lead monitors in the New Bern MSA. As shown in Figure F13, the MSA does not have any permitted facilities located within its bounds that emit 0.5 tons or more of lead per year.9 7 Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Nitrogen Dioxide, Federal Register, Vol. 75, No. 26, Feb. 9, 2010, available on the worldwide web at https://www3.epa.gov/ttn/naaqs/standards/nox/fr/20100209.pdf. 8 Revisions to Ambient Monitoring Quality Assurance and Other Requirements, Federal Register, Vol. 81, No. 59, Monday, March 28, 2016, p. 17248, available on the worldwide web at https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016- 03-28/pdf/2016-06226.pdf. 9 United States Environmental Protection Agency. 2020 EPA Toxics Release Inventory Tracker available at https://edap.epa.gov/public/extensions/TRIToxicsTracker/TRIToxicsTracker.html#. F11 Figure F13. Lead and lead compounds emissions to the air in the New Bern MSA from 2009 to 2020 The 2015 ozone monitoring requirements did not require adding an ozone monitor to the New Bern MSA. As shown in Figure F14, modeling indicates that the area has a low probability of exceeding the 2015 ozone standard. DAQ operates an ozone monitor just to the west of the MSA at Lenoir Community College (LCC), which has a similar probability of exceeding the standard as anywhere in the MSA. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency operates a clean air status and trends network, or CASTNET, monitor just to the southeast of the MSA. These two monitors should adequately characterize ozone concentrations in this area. Figure F14. Map of ozone exceedance probability for the New Bern (white circle) MSA F12 This area also did not have to add any monitors to comply with the 2010 nitrogen dioxide monitoring requirements because it does not have any roadways that exceed the population threshold.10 It also did not need to add monitors for the 2010 SO2 monitoring requirements because there are no facilities in the MSA emitting large enough quantities of SO2 to trigger source-oriented monitoring. This area will not need to add monitors to comply with the changes to the carbon monoxide monitoring requirements because the population is less than 1,000,000. (4) The Non-MSA Portion of the Washington Monitoring Region The non-MSA Portion of the Washington monitoring region consists of 13 counties: Beaufort, Bertie, Chowan, Dare, Greene, Hertford, Hyde, Lenoir, Martin, Pasquotank, Perquimans, Tyrrell and Washington. No MSAs are located here. The Kill Devil Hills micropolitan statistical area, or MiSA, is in Dare County and the Washington MiSA is in Beaufort County. Pasquotank and Perquimans counties are included in the Elizabeth City MiSA. The Kinston MiSA is in Lenoir County. DAQ operates three monitoring sites in this area. These sites are located at Jamesville in Martin County, at Lenoir Community College in Lenoir County and at the Bayview Ferry in Beaufort County. Figure F15 shows the location of these monitoring sites. Figure F15. Location of the monitoring sites in the Non-MSA Portion of the Washington Monitoring Region 10 Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Nitrogen Dioxide, Federal Register, Vol. 75, No. 26, Feb. 9, 2010, available on the worldwide web at https://www3.epa.gov/ttn/naaqs/standards/nox/fr/20100209.pdf. F13 At the Jamesville site, 37-117-0001, DAQ operates a seasonal ozone monitor, a special purpose SO2 monitor that operates for 12 months every three years and a special purpose PM10 monitor that operates for 12 months every three years. Figure F16 through Figure F24 provide a view of the Jamesville site as well as views looking north, northeast, east, southeast, south, southwest, west and northwest from the site. DAQ shut down the fine-particle monitors at this site on Dec. 31, 2015. Figure F16. Jamesville ozone, particle and sulfur dioxide monitoring site Figure F17. Looking north from the Jamesville site Figure F18. Looking northeast from the Jamesville site F14 Figure F19. Looking northwest from the Jamesville site Figure F20. Looking west from the Jamesville site Figure F21. Looking southwest from the Jamesville site Figure F22. Looking east from the Jamesville site Figure F23. Looking southeast from the Jamesville site Figure F24. Looking south from the Jamesville site At the Bayview Ferry site (37-013-0151) in Beaufort County, DAQ operates an SO2 monitor. This site began operating in January 2011 to replace the Aurora SO2 monitoring site. Figure F25 shows the locations of the two sites. In 2010, the PCS Phosphate manufacturing facility started logging near the Aurora SO2 monitoring site, located on the fence line of their manufacturing facility. PCS rerouted the logging trucks so they no longer went by the monitoring station. They also indicated they did not plan to F15 mine the area near the Aurora monitoring site until sometime around 2015. However, DAQ decided to relocate the monitor across the Pamlico River to the Bayview Ferry station because more people live there and this site is downwind of the PCS facility. Figure F25. Location of the Bayview Ferry site (B) relative to the Aurora site (A) Figure F26 through Figure F30 show the site and views looking north, east, south and west. This site is source-oriented, located downwind of the PCS Phosphate facility in Beaufort County. On July 1, 2016, the DAQ submitted a modelling analysis to the EPA demonstrating that this site is a suitable 1-hour SO2 source-oriented monitoring site location to satisfy the data requirements rule for the PCS facility.11 11 The NC Network Monitoring Plan Volume 1 Appendix K. PCS Phosphate, Inc.: Aurora Siting Analysis and Additional Site Information, July 1, 2016, available on the worldwide web at http://xapps.ncdenr.org/aq/documents/DocsSearch.do?dispatch=download&documentId=13149 F16 Figure F26. Bayview Ferry sulfur dioxide monitoring site Figure F27.The Bayview Ferry site looking north Figure F28. Looking east from the Bayview Ferry site Figure F29. Looking west from the Bayview Ferry site Figure F30. The Bayview Ferry site looking south At the Lenoir Community College site, 37-107-0004, DAQ operates a seasonal ozone monitor and a rotating special purpose PM10 monitor that operates for 12 months every third year. In 2009, the college F17 installed a screen between the monitoring site and nearby baseball field to block glare from an observatory from interfering with the people playing baseball. In 2010, the college also installed a large scoreboard. Thus, in 2011, the division moved the site to another location on the campus. Figure F31 shows the locations of the old monitoring site and the new monitoring site to the west. Figure F32 through Figure F40 provide a view of the monitoring site and views looking north, northeast, east, southeast, south, southwest, west and northwest. DAQ shut down the collocated meteorological tower measuring wind speed, wind direction, solar radiation, two-meter and 10-meter ambient temperature, relative humidity and rain fall on Nov. 3, 2014. The division shut down the fine particle monitor at this site at the end of 2013. Figure F31. New and old LCC monitoring site locations Figure F32. Lenoir Community College ozone monitoring site F18 Figure F33. Looking north from the LCC site Figure F34. Looking northwest from the LCC site Figure F35. Looking northeast from the LCC site Figure F36. Looking east from the LCC site Figure F37. Looking west from the LCC site Figure F38. Looking southwest from the LCC site Figure F39. Looking southeast from the LCC site Figure F40. Looking south from the LCC site The lead monitoring network requirements, as modified in 2016,12 do not require lead monitors F19 in this area of the Washington monitoring region. The non-MSA portion of the Washington monitoring region does not have any permitted facilities located within its bounds that emit 0.5 tons or more of lead per year.13 Figure F41. Lead and lead compounds emissions to the air from 2009 to 2020 in the portion of the WARO monitoring area that is not in an MSA The 2015 ozone-monitoring requirements require monitoring to start one month earlier on March 1 instead of April 1 starting in 2017. The 2010 nitrogen dioxide monitoring requirements14 did not result in additional monitoring in this area because there is not an MSA with a population of 1,000,000 or more and no roadways in this area exceed the traffic threshold. The 2010 SO2 monitoring requirements did not increase the number of monitors in this area because the existing source-oriented monitor at Bayview is adequate and appropriately sited to serve as the required source-oriented monitor for the PCS Phosphate facility. The 2011 changes to the carbon monoxide monitoring requirements did not add additional monitors to the area because the population is under 1,000,000. (5) The North Carolina Portion of the Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News MSA The North Carolina portion of the Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News MSA consists of three counties – Camden, Currituck and Gates. DAQ currently does not operate any monitoring sites in these counties. The division has an agreement with Virginia that Virginia will fulfill all North Carolina’s monitoring requirements for the Camden, Currituck and Gates County portion of the Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News MSA.15 12 Revisions to Ambient Monitoring Quality Assurance and Other Requirements, Federal Register, Vol. 81, No. 59, Monday, March 28, 2016, p. 17248, available on the worldwide web at https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-03-28/pdf/2016-06226.pdf. 13 United States Environmental Protection Agency. 2020 EPA Toxics Release Inventory Tracker available at https://edap.epa.gov/public/extensions/TRIToxicsTracker/TRIToxicsTracker.html#. 14 Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Nitrogen Dioxide, Federal Register, Vol. 75, No. 26, Feb. 9, 2010, available on the worldwide web at https://www3.epa.gov/ttn/naaqs/standards/nox/fr/20100209.pdf. 15 North Carolina - Virginia Monitoring Agreement, 05/09/2016, available at http://xapps.ncdenr.org/aq/documents/DocsSearch.do?dispatch=download&documentId=7862. F20 The lead monitoring network requirements, as modified in 2016, 16 do not require any lead monitoring in these counties. As shown in Figure F42, the North Carolina counties in this MSA do not have any permitted facilities located within their bounds that emit 0.5 ton or more of lead per year.17 Figure F42. Map of the Virginia Beach MSA showing locations of lead and lead compounds releases from 2009 to 2020 The 2015 ozone monitoring requirements did not add monitors to these counties. They are part of an MSA that already meets the population exposure monitoring requirements for urban areas. This area is not required to add monitors to comply with the 2010 nitrogen dioxide monitoring requirements18 because it does not have any roadways that exceed the traffic threshold. It also is not required to monitor by the 2010 SO2 monitoring requirements because there are no facilities in these counties emitting large enough quantities of SO2 to trigger source-oriented monitoring. This area will also not need to monitor to meet the carbon monoxide monitoring requirements because Virginia will meet those requirements. 16 Revisions to Ambient Monitoring Quality Assurance and Other Requirements, Federal Register, Vol. 81, No. 59, Monday, March 28, 2016, p. 17248, available on the worldwide web at https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-03-28/pdf/2016-06226.pdf. 17 United States Environmental Protection Agency. 2020 EPA Toxics Release Inventory Tracker available at https://edap.epa.gov/public/extensions/TRIToxicsTracker/TRIToxicsTracker.html#. 18 Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Nitrogen Dioxide, Federal Register, Vol. 75, No. 26, Feb. 9, 2010, available on the worldwide web at https://www3.epa.gov/ttn/naaqs/standards/nox/fr/20100209.pdf. F21 Appendix F.1 Annual Network Site Review Forms for 2022 Pitt County Agricultural Center in Greenville Jamesville Bayview Ferry Lenoir Community College in Kinston F22 F23 F24 F25 F26 F27 F28 F29